3 Ways (and 1 Tool) to Engage Your Staff in Your Next Team Meeting

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Last week a colleague asked for help organizing her thoughts for an upcoming team meeting. She had prepared a set of PowerPoint slides and was preparing to distribute a hard copy of some job duties that she wanted to review with her team… for the third time.

As we honed in on the specific problem she wanted to address, I asked how comfortable she’d be in changing her presentation tactic. Instead of talking at her team (for the third time), what if she laid out the problem and then asked for their input in solving it?

She gave it a whirl. Afterward, she said her team was engaged for the entire meeting and they offered more suggestions and solutions than she could shake a stick at.

Shortly after this experience I came across this image, lifted from a highly entertaining article on the importance of presentations as a performance vs. a conversation.

HugSpeak - Some speeches

It got me wondering: why do we, as managers, so often feel that we need to come up with all the answers for our teams?

Following are three suggestions (and a tool) to engage meeting attendees more effectively:

When appropriate, send information in advance and insist attendees come prepared.

I recognize that there are times when news needs to be broken to everyone at the same time, in person. In my experience, that’s generally the exception, not the rule. If there’s something new to be shared with the team – a new development or a new policy, for example – then send it out in advance. And request that everyone come to the meeting prepared to discuss how the new development or policy will impact them.

Make them do the work.

In the example I shared (above), my colleague decided to abandon her lecture-style review of an existing policy. She admitted it would have put her team to sleep. Instead, she chose to challenge the team to list as many responsibilities as they could think of that they needed to fulfill in accordance with this policy. It kept her team awake, on their toes, and it allowed her to see what they remembered and where possible gaps existed between the policy and their day-to-day practices.

Let them come up with solutions.

Too many managers (myself included) feel that they need to come up with solutions to every problem – big or small. In the example I shared, my colleague abandoned her plan to tell her team how the problem was going to be solved. Instead she solicited solutions from her team. My colleague no longer had to stress over whether a solution she came up with would meet the needs of her staff, and because her staff came up with the solutions, they had a stake in owning and carrying out these solutions.

A word of caution: engaging people takes time, effort and preparation

Taking a risk by creating a more engaging team meeting can yield fantastic results that include:

  • More energy during team meetings,
  • Better use of everyone’s time,
  • More ideas from more people,
  • More innovative solutions, and
  • Shared ownership of problems and solutions.

You won’t find success, however, by merely wanting to engage people. Engaging your team or audience in a meeting requires advanced planning and meticulous preparation.

You need to map out exactly how much time you’d like to spend introducing a topic, facilitating a discussion, and discussing next steps. You need to make sure you’ve defined exactly what results you want to see. Without planning, you could suddenly find that you spent too much time setting up a problem and you’ve run out of time for discussion. Or perhaps you’ll find you’ve spent too much time brainstorming and not enough time refining ideas or clearly articulating next steps.

If you’re looking to plan a meeting that engages your audience, here is a link to a presentation planning template that could help you keep your next meeting organized.

Have you found a strategy to better engage people in your meetings? Please share in the comments section.

Know someone who could use some help engaging people in their meetings? Pass this link along.

Six More Training Icebreaker Questions That Begin With “Would You Rather…?”

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Would you rather?

An effective icebreaker accomplishes three things:

  1. Attendees are introduced to one another
  2. The energy in the room picks up
  3. Attendees begin to think about the session’s topic (preferably in a fun, light-hearted way)

A quick game of “Would you rather…” can help break the ice at your next meeting or presentation by challenging participants to think about a pair of seemingly absurd choices, and then justify why they chose a particular option. It can shed some light on the mindset of each participant and can lead to a lot of laughter in the process.

Plus, who doesn’t like to have the sweet sound of laughter coming from their meeting room?

While I shared ten potential “Would you rather…” questions in a previous post, here are six more:

Would you rather…

  1. …be scheduled to deliver a 90 minute presentation at 1:00pm (immediately after lunch) OR at 5:30pm (when everyone wants to go home)?
  2. …be able to shoot actual lasers out of your laser pointer OR have to dodge actual bullets every time a bullet point appears on a PowerPoint slide?
  3. …have a face that is a functioning clock OR have hair made entirely out of neon pink post-it notes?
  4. …be chased around the room by a giant, radioactive LCD projector as you try to set up for your presentation OR actually be married to Mr. Sketch?
  5. …only be able to respond to people and situations with the first thought that pops into your head OR only be able to speak in the form of a question during your presentation?
  6. …realize (much too late) that your suitcase was switched with Lady Gaga’s and all you have to wear for your keynote speech is a suit made out of raw meat OR wake up to discover the only way you can get from point A to point B is by moonwalking?

Do you have additional “Would you rather…?” type icebreaker questions? Let’s see ‘em in the comments section.

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Clubbin’ with HR

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Clubbin with HR

Imagine you’re standing in the rope line, waiting for a while but still excited about the prospects of getting in to a club so exclusive that few of your friends and classmates have ever been able to get in. Then the moment arrives. The bouncer points his finger at you. “Come with me,” he says, plucking you out of the line, escorting you past a bunch of other people and into the club.

The music is thumping. A few heads turn to look at you. One or two even say “hello”. Most ignore you. Should you go to the bar and order a drink? Hit the dance floor? Find a table? Decisions, decisions.

At the bar you try your smoothest move to get the bar tender’s attention, but he ignores you. The patrons around you laugh. “You’re not doing it right,” says another club goer, then walks away.

Maybe the dance floor will be a better place to start.

You quickly realize that the type of dancing – while it seems to be working for the folks on the dance floor – is like no dance you’ve ever seen. You give it a whirl, but your moves turn out more like Elaine’s spazz dance from Seinfeld. Being out of sync with everyone else means you’re stepping on toes and knocking people’s drinks out of their hands all night.

It’s not fun. But you come back the next night. And every night for months.

Eventually you start to get the hang of it, though it would have been nice if someone had taught you the secret to ordering drinks on that first night. It would have been much less embarrassing and much more fun for everyone if someone had practiced a few of this club’s proprietary dance steps with you from the beginning.

This scenario plays out every day in companies across the country and around the world. Your organization is a bit like an exclusive club. You carefully craft your recruitment and hiring process. You spend countless hours interviewing and meeting to decide which candidate to pull out of the “rope line” and invite into your club.

And then what?

The big questions that too many organizations don’t answer adequately are:

  • How do we effectively orient new employees to the organization during the first days and weeks?
  • How do we effectively integrate new employees into their roles and the organization’s culture over their first weeks and months?

Seriously, click the link below and download this book

Michelle Baker of Phase(Two)Learning helps HR professionals and hiring managers answer these questions with a new ebook entitled: Onboarding Tools for Hiring Managers: Tips, Tools & Rules to Set Your New Employees Up for Success. If you’re a hiring manager or responsible for the onboarding of new staff, I strongly recommend taking a look at this short book for two reasons:

  1. It helps answer the above questions in a short, succinct and easy-to-digest format, and
  2. It provides space for you to reflect on key points and to identify where your orientation and onboarding processes may have holes.

Onboarding Tools for Hiring Managers: Tips, Tools & Rules to Set Your New Employees Up for Success is part book, part workbook and (for the time being) completely free. So there’s nothing to lose.

If you want to squeeze every last bit of value out of your employees, then you need to begin on Day 1 with high quality, engaging and meaningful orientation and onboarding processes.

Have you found an orientation or onboarding strategy that’s particularly meaningful? I’d love to hear about it in the comments section below.

Know someone responsible for orientation or onboarding? Pass this link along!

Lessons in Presentation Skills from Hiroshima

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Atomic Bomb Dome

Last week I had an opportunity to spend a day in Hiroshima, where I had an opportunity to visit the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum. As I reflected on how the museum curators put together such a moving and powerful experience, it made me wonder what transferable lessons there could be for anyone who wants to make a presentation designed to move their audience to action.

It began with the brain

Entering the museum, we had an opportunity to learn about the history of Hiroshima. It was interesting. And awful. But I already knew much of this history (at least the World War II stuff). If the museum had stopped here, I don’t know that I would have been as moved or reflective when I walked back onto the street.

But it didn’t stop here. Physically, we had to walk through a long cat walk in order to enter the “main building.”

It tapped into the heart

Once we arrived in the main building, we entered a completely different atmosphere. I’m not sure I’d ever been in a museum that was as crowded yet as quiet as this. Stories of survivors. Tattered and burned clothes of children who did not survive. Exhibits and images that showed the effects of radiation on the body.

This was no longer some awful yet abstract moment in the history of the world. It was real. It was powerful. It made me think of one of my father’s favorite sayings: “there but for the grace of God go I.” Even as visitors, we could imagine what it was like to be in Hiroshima on August 6, 1945.

A call to action

Before we left the museum, there was an opportunity to sign a petition for a worldwide convention on nuclear weapons. I observed many people signing their names.

An opportunity to reflect

Outside of the Peace Museum is a large park with greenery, an eternal flame, several monuments and the Atomic Bomb Dome (pictured above, it was one of the only structures remaining once The Bomb exploded). After going through such a powerful experience, I was grateful for the time and space I had to reflect on what I had just seen and learned.

A lesson in presentation skills

Anyone who has read Switch by Chip and Dan Heath will recognize the first three elements from above: addressing the rational side of things, speaking to the heart and “shaping the path” (the call to action). These are the Heath brothers’ three essential elements of change management. The Peace Museum in Hiroshima was exhibit A of how these three elements can combine to create a powerful and moving experience.

Having time and space to reflect and being able to process the experience by talking with my wife enabled me to more fully absorb what I had seen and learned. She talked about things she saw that I must have missed. She talked about things going through her mind that I hadn’t thought about.

The thing I find most boring about a lot of museums is the same thing I find most boring about so many presentations and training sessions and new hire orientation modules: they only speak to the rational side of a topic. By tapping into the emotional side as well as the rational side and having time and space to reflect, the Peace Museum was an experience that will stick with me for a long, long time. If only we could say the same about all the presentations and training sessions and new hire orientation modules we have to sit through.

The next time you get in front of an audience, what will you do in order to tap into both the rational and emotional side of your audience? Will you allow them time and space to reflect on and process what you’ve presented?

5 Haikus about Learning and Development

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I’ve been in Japan for the past two weeks – a combination of an industry conference and some R&R. I like it here. And to give you a taste of my experience, I’ve decided to give each of you a gift. The gift of a blog post in traditional Japanese Haiku.

Instructional Design

What do they need most?

How will you know they “get it”?

Let them show and tell

Classroom-based Training

Please use Mr. Sketch

Booooooo for the sage on the stage

Yay for engagement

Blended Learning

Flipping the classroom

Learning content on your own

Then show your mad skillz

Elearning

Scenario-based

Simulating real life stuff

As fun as a game!

Learner Experience

They are the reason

We all get a nice paycheck

Always respect them

How about it? Feeling inspired? If you have a learning and development-based Haiku, I’d love to read it in the comments section below. Writing Haikus also make a great ice breaking activity. For more on this idea, click here.

One final Haiku (sorry, I can’t stop today!):

Know Haiku lovers?

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5 Predictions for the Future of Learning and Development

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Have you ever wondered what the future of workplace learning will look like? As I look around, here are five things I think will happen within the next five years:

Xbox will transform classroom-based delivery

It’s been several years since I first saw this TED Talk and it unleashed a million ideas for me in how it could be used in the classroom. Can you imagine harnessing the power of augmented reality in the classroom? Simulations! Case studies! Even role plays would be fun.

Of course, I’m sure some presenters would smother this technology’s potential by simply throwing a bunch of augmented reality bullet points at their audience, but I think overall this type of technology will benefit classroom-based learning (and even webinars!) by replacing rote lecture and theory with more content based in real-world applications. With photo and video apps for smart phones, tablets and PCs becoming more interactive each day, it’s only a matter of time before you’ll see this at an ASTD conference near you.

Storyline will be the PowerPoint of the future

Unfortunately, as I look ahead, the future isn’t completely bright. Rapid elearning authoring tools have been around for a while, but I’ve never seen anything as intuitive or easy to use as Articulate Storyline. This software is exciting because individuals or teams responsible for an organization’s learning and development initiatives can now produce professional quality elearning at a fraction of the cost.

Storyline’s ease-of-use and intuitiveness, however, also turns my glass half empty as I look ahead. I see organizations rapidly loading up their learning management systems with bullet point-laden, click-through elearning modules. Yes, way too many of these exist now. In the future, they will be so easy to produce and clog up an LMS that the “good old days” will be a time when learners only had to spend 3 hours in the classroom, sitting through a presentation with 152 slides and 537 bullet points.

You won’t be able to discreetly check your email during a webinar

In the early 90s, I remember a commercial for some company (GE? AT&T?) that talked about fiber optics and the future and it had images of an American college lecture hall and toward the end, the professor called on someone in some distant land, and the camera panned out to see a bunch of students on the projector screen, and then there was a shot of a whole other classroom someplace in Asia that was attending this lecture.

This kind of exists today with video conference services and Skype and Facetime the like, but I’ve seen it primarily used for staff meetings or meetings across geographic locations or friends talking to one another. There’s been a movement in the webinar business to make webinars more engaging by broadcasting a live video feed of the facilitator. I envision a web conference interface that will soon come along and make it much easier for everyone to see one another, creating greater facilitator-to-audience and audience-to-audience connections.

You’ll still be able to “multi-task”, but others will see you doing it.

The “flipped classroom” will be right-side up

While not a brand new concept, it’s still novel to find a training program in which learners are asked to learn the content on their own prior to an in-person training session, and then classroom time is spent in various activities challenging the learners to apply what they’ve learned. In higher education, however, this is becoming a more regular part of instructional design and recent graduates are much more accustomed to this style.

There have been a lot of not-so-nice things written about Gen Y (apparently there’s an entire generation of young adults Snapchatting naked selfies and Tweeting their lives from their parents’ homes where there is barely enough room for their adult children because of all their kids’ trophies cluttering up the place). When it comes to designing effective and engaging learning experiences, however, I think Gen Y has a thing or two to teach old school Corporate America.

50% of all presentations will be engaging and lead to change

In 2010, McKinsey released a study saying that only 25% of corporate training dollars actually led to anything being done differently or better following a training session. In the next five years I think that number is going to double.

While some current big names in the learning and development field spend their time Tweeting snarky comments about the fact that there is a transfer-of-training problem, I’ve met a lot of folks beginning to break into the thought leadership of the L&D professional who are action-oriented and patient enough to meet presenters and SMEs at a skill level where they need to be met in order to improve their presentation skills.

Presentations will be engaging and lead to change when people who don’t attend ASTD conferences (indeed, people who giggle at the acronym ASTD because it sounds too much like “an STD”) take an interest in how to engage their audience and how to move their audience to act. In the next few months, I’ll be sharing specific ideas (and maybe even an online tool or two) in how I plan to do my part to transform every presentation into something that’s engaging and will lead to change. Want to join me in turning this prediction into a reality?

Is your mind blown? Do you have doubts about any of these? Maybe you have a prediction of your own. Look into your crystal ball and let me know what you think in the comment section below.

Know someone who is interested in what the future may hold? Share this link with them.

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In Order for Corporate Training to Improve, L&D Practitioners Need to Lose their Snobbery

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On a scale from 1-10, how much do you love to be informed that you’re doing something wrong by a cocky, snide, snarky, arrogant know-it-all?

Training Snobbery 1

There is so much work to be done when it comes to helping our colleagues and clients to improve their presentation skills. Over the past 15 years as I’ve worked in the learning and development space, one of the biggest lessons I’ve learned is that we need to meet people where they’re at.

Some people will be ready to jump right in, assessing the needs of their learners, organizing their thoughts with a presentation plan, then selecting the most appropriate visual aids (maybe PowerPoint, maybe something else), practicing their delivery and finally executing an amazing learning experience.

Some decision-makers will identify technology as the best solution to deliver differentiated, on-demand learning experiences.

Most people will need to be eased into this process. Here is a reflection that was written last year by one of my colleagues who truly evolved from SME to engaging presenter.

I’m not a heavy Twitter user, but I do follow several of the “big names” in the learning and development field. It always makes me uncomfortable when I read a tweet like this:

Training Snobbery

Why do we need to be snarky when it comes to trying to describe the motivations and mind-set of non-learning and development professionals? This particular message was tweeted during a recent elearning industry conference. The problem is that the question (why do people want classroom training?) was being asked to a room of learning and development professionals whose livelihoods revolve around technology and elearning.

If we want a non-snarky, sincere answer and true insights into the mindset of the people who actually approve and schedule classroom-based training, then we shouldn’t be asking ourselves why people might want classroom training. We need to spend time asking and understanding line managers, HR professionals and executives who request training sessions.

What are you doing to get a better understanding of the mindset of SMEs and others who deliver presentations and training in order to truly help them succeed? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments section below.

This training could save you from a $1.875 million lawsuit!

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Would you like to be on the losing end of a lawsuit that cost your employer $1.875 million because you were too buddy-buddy with your hourly, non-exempt staff?

Personally, I would not like to be the cause for a multi-million dollar court award against my employer. And I would hang on every last word a trainer says in order to prevent being put in a position to lose a court decision like that.

Last week I had an opportunity to attend a manager training which was led by an employment attorney. By the end of the three-hour training, she had clicked through 152 slides and somehow she covered FIVE HUNDRED AND THIRTY SEVEN BULLET POINTS during this session. She was efficient with the pace by which she blitzed through her material. Mind-numbingly boring… but efficient.

Yet for some reason she didn’t attempt to open our eyes to the real-world, real-money consequences of our actions as managers until she was two hours (and 148 slides) into her presentation.

Everything Wrong with Corporate Training

This 3-hour session represents everything that’s wrong with corporate training:

  • 17 managers invest a combined 51 work hours of their time in attending this session.
  • The outside expert (in this case an employment attorney) is given a pre-packaged, non-customized slide deck to run through.
  • She adds a few stories from the trenches to illustrate her points (537 bullet points to be exact) and she encourages people to ask questions so that the training can be “interactive”.
  • And people walk away entertained by the stories, thinking the presenter was good and nobody will ever know whether any of the 17 managers in attendance can do things better or differently as a result of the 51 combined hours they invested in this session.

The managers were never asked to demonstrate proficiency in a single skill that could avoid a $1.875 million lawsuit. The managers weren’t given an opportunity to test their skills at identifying what unintentional discrimination in the workplace might look like. The managers were never challenged to describe what “appropriate documentation” might include.

Fixing Corporate Training Isn’t Really That Hard

Following the training, I was speaking with another manager who had attended the session and he said how surprised he was that the speaker didn’t even ask us whether we did certain things during recruitment, interview or regular supervision activities that might get us into legal trouble.

Just ask a question

One of the simplest ways for a presenter to customize a session, even if it’s on the fly and in the moment, is to ask questions of the audience. Give us a pop quiz. Or just ask to see a show of hands and start a sentence with: “How many of you…”

Discuss a brief case study

I’m sure that employment attorneys have seen many, many cases that involve “grey areas” – actions in which one side could claim discrimination and the other side could claim that they were treating each employee fairly and equitably. Another simple way to engage the group and check to see if they’re “getting it” is to show a few case studies and ask the managers what they would do in certain situations.

Show a video

Similar to the case study idea, simply showing the group a video or two and asking what the managers identify as appropriate or inappropriate management strategies is yet another way to see if the group is “getting it.”

Mock Trial

Finally, if you really want to scare the heck out of the managers (and the executive staff), or perhaps better said, if you really want everyone in the organization to take this topic seriously, it would be fun to present the managers with some information and then ask them to demonstrate how they’d handle the scenario. Once they complete their demonstration, the attorney/facilitator could either say:

  • Congratulations, you handled that well! Or,
  • Bummer. Your organization now owes that employee $1.875 million

Have any ideas that are different from what’s described above in order to fix corporate training? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

Know someone in a position to fix corporate training? Pass this blog post along!

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Book Review: The Manager’s Guide to Presentations

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69-word Summary:

New managers have a lot to learn. Supervising and coaching is a major element that most new managers lack and it’s a reason that many new managers struggle… The Manager’s Guide to Presentations won’t help you there. Managers also need to deliver presentations that motivate, persuade, inform and influence. This book is all about helping managers (and anyone else who presents) to prepare, deliver and assess presentations that motivate, persuade, inform and influence.

The Details:

  • Author: Lauren Hug
  • Price: $17.99 on Amazon; $7.99 as a Kindle book
  • 68 Pages

Bright Spots:

  • The Length: I’ve read a lot of books on presentations, and after the first 100 pages or so, they tend to get very redundant. In this book, Lauren Hug respects her readers by making her point and then moving on.
  • The Tight Organization: Related to the length and the author’s ability to make her point and move on, this book is tightly organized: what to do before presenting, during the presentation and afterwards. Period. There were very times that I thought: “Huh, that’s an interesting concept and if I had unlimited time I might someday try that, but honestly I’m too busy to ever actually do that in real-life.”
  • The templates! This isn’t just a book to read and put away on the shelf, never to be touched again. There are templates to help organize your thoughts on your audience’s needs and expectations, addressing your personal concerns and fears about public speaking, putting together your content, creating interaction with your audience and once your presentation is over there is a template for getting meaningful feedback. Truly, this is a book to work through… unless you buy the Kindle version, which makes it tough to write in. Which brings me to my next point…

Room for Improvement:

I do really like the templates in this book. It would be nice to be able to print them out and write on them. It would be great if downloadable, printable templates were available on the Hug Speak website. Until then, I’ll just have to re-create the templates in Word.

Who Should Buy It?

As mentioned earlier, this book is not only for new managers but anyone who finds themselves needing to put together a meaningful presentation. It’s $7.99 (e-reader version), it’s less than 100 pages, it can be read in one evening, it has templates for organizing your thoughts and it might even help you prepare for and deliver an engaging presentation that leads others to act. What do you have to lose?

5 Things Presenters Can Learn from March Madness

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It’s the most wonderful time of the year. March Madness!

"George the Colonial" gives his autograph to Bill Cosby during the 1996 Atlantic-10 basketball tournament

“George the Colonial” gives his autograph to Bill Cosby during the 1996 Atlantic-10 basketball tournament

As a former college mascot, I had an opportunity to see March Madness up close and personal. Here are five lessons I believe are transferable from the basketball court to the corporate training room.

  1. Cinderella can win over the crowd. Sure people love the big names. Bob Pike, Nancy Duarte, Michael Allen – they’re the Duke, Kentucky and North Carolina of the learning and development world. Of course, if you have something to present then there’s a reason you’re in front of the audience. Just like George Mason (who beat a lot of teams they weren’t supposed to in 2006 to advance to the Final 4) and Butler (who came within a half-court buzzer beater of knocking off Duke in the 2010 NCAA finals), it’s important that you put together a strong plan. If you can offer an amazing learning experience, people will want to see you at the front of the room again. Conversely, if you put together a stinker just because you don’t feel people are expecting much from you, then few people will want to see you back.
  2. Someone is always watching you. One of the first rules of mascotting is that, regardless of what’s happening in the game, there will always be someone watching you at any given moment of the game. Given this fact, it’s important to be entertaining throughout the entire game (or at least avoid scratching yourself and doing other non-mascot-like behaviors). As a presenter, this is also true. Even if it seems that everyone is engaged in a small group discussion, the minute you pull out your cell phone to check your messages, it gives permission to every other person in the room to do the same thing. They’re watching you.
  3. The more crowd involvement, the better. As a mascot, I fed off the energy of the crowd. I also hoped to create energy, because I had a feeling that our players preferred to play in front of a roaring crowd. Getting them doing the wave? Absolutely. Crowd surfing? Definitely. What’s the equivalent in the training room? Giving your audience an opportunity to get involved through discussions. Or Q&A. Or a pop quiz. Want more ideas? Click here for an entire post about this.
  4. Creativity matters. Even the best ideas get old after a while. When doing a death-defying pyramid with the cheerleading team became routine, I worked with my coach to learn how to do some tumbling and added a standing back-tuck. It added a new challenge, a new level of difficulty… it was just new. The same goes for presentations you may have given dozens of times in the past. Why not try something new – it will challenge yourself, and your audience will probably appreciate it. Looking for inspiration? Go to YouTube. Check out a TED Talk or two. Take a look at some amazing PowerPoint decks at Slideshare.
  5. Close. Out. The. Game! When my GW Colonials squared off against the Iowa Hawkeyes in the first round of the 1996 NCAA tournament, it was a close game at half time (we were down 1). With about 10 minutes left in the game, my Colonials were up 17. The team was excited. The fans were excited. I was excited. And then we were up 10. And then we were up 5. And then we were on the first flight back to Washington, DC the next day because we lost in the final minutes. Too many presentations are like this. Great content. A great experience. And then it just kind of ends with a plop. No momentum. People just go back to their offices and… nothing. As a presenter, it’s essential to wrap up the presentation with a strong summary, a call to action, something that the audience will remember and do something with.

What did I miss? Are there any lessons from March Madness that you’re applying to your presentation skills? Write your thoughts in the comments section below.

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