Using Your Downtime to Increase Skills and Knowledge

Today is President’s Day in the U.S. and many of us do not need to work. At least officially. I find that using downtime to read an article I otherwise wouldn’t have the time to read or play around with a new skill that I’ve been wanting to try using Articulate Storyline can be surprisingly invigorating.

I’ve also found Twitter to be a great source of articles or videos I otherwise wouldn’t have been exposed to as well a place in which people from my network are forever sharing new tips or tricks or work-arounds.

If you’re looking for some new sources of inspiration or just some places to begin finding new information during your downtime, here is a list of ten people you may want to begin following on Twitter:

1. David Anderson: If you’re looking for new inspiration for an eLearning project, David facilitates Articulate’s Weekly eLearning Challenge. Check it out. Heck, if you’re inspired, go ahead and submit your own eLearning experiment to share with Articulate’s online community.

2. Clark Quinn: Clark focuses on technology, learning and brain science. He’s the author of a book called Revolutionize Learning & Development: Performance and Innovation Strategy in the Information Age and you’ll also find him participating in various Tweet Chats.

3. Lauren Hug and HugSpeak: Looking to up your game when it comes to how you’re using social media and applying your own communication strategy? These are the things Lauren tweets about. She shares helpful tips and interesting articles. She’s also the author of The Manager’s Guide to Presentations.

4. JD Dillon: JD is the author of the Just Curious… blog and just seems to have his hands on the pulse of learning and development – in terms of technology, classroom and personal knowledge management.

5. Will Thalheimer: Will is a first class myth buster when it comes to what works and what doesn’t in learning and development. I’m not talking about fads, I’m talking about research and science. Will has a passion for sifting through peer reviewed research in order to explain in plain English why things like learning styles have little impact and how learning objectives should actually be framed. He just launched a new website called debunker.club. His learning audit website is also super helpful with things to keep in mind while designing learning experiences.

6. Jim Kelly: Need I say more? I’m not all about learning and development, after all. Plus, he’s the only quarterback to lead a team to four straight Super Bowls. What’s not to like about this guy?

7. Jane Hart: In addition to passing along interesting articles throughout the week, I especially appreciate Jane’s “Not to be missed” compilation of articles at the end of the month.

Jane’s Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies also publishes the annual list of Top 100 Tools for Learning.

8. Matthew Guyan: eLearning is at the center of Matthew’s posts, so you’ll find samples of his eLearning work (via eLearning Challenges in the Articulate online community) as well as a smattering of information he’ll pass along from other authors. Plus, he’s in Australia, so if you’re in the U.S. and hit with a bout of insomnia, you can read his tweets all night long!

9. Jane McGonigal: Definitely the smartest person on gamification I’ve followed. She’ll post research about game design from time to time, she’ll post about her successes and struggles in writing her next book, and she’ll remind you who’s still in the mix during major tennis tournaments. Jane also has several TED talks to her credit and is the author of Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World.

10. TED Talks: Perhaps there are times when you’re not in the mood to read another article. I find TED Talks valuable not just because of the fascinating mix of topics I can learn about, but also the way in which the speakers deliver crisp, engaging presentations. Finding a newly released TED talk in my Twitter feed is a handy reminder that I don’t always need to read an article to be exposed to a new or interesting concept.

And if you think this blog is pretty good, you should also give me a follow on Twitter.

Think someone else might find this list of resources handy? Why not send it along? Or hit the Twitter button below and Tweet it along to your followers!

 

 

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