8 training-related resources that might help with your next presentation

Antioch - Explaining Slide

Earlier this month I had an opportunity to co-facilitate a webinar in the Early Childhood Investigations webinar series. During the session, I mentioned several resources that presenters may find handy as they prepare for their next presentation.

Every time I mentioned one of these resources, participants would send a chat asking for a link to the resource. My colleague, Tim Waxenfelter, set up a page with links to each of these resources.

If you’re interested in any of these resources, here is a little more information about each one:   Continue reading

An elearning and in-person facilitation lesson from my interaction with a drug dealer

Drug-free Zone

“Come back here after the sun goes down and we’ll see how brave you are then.”

I’m pretty sure that was the first and only time someone’s made a sincere threat on my life. As I reflect on the mistake I made that led to the above quote, I think that L&D professionals make the same mistake in their instructional design and facilitation every day.   Continue reading

3 Lessons that the Women’s Marches Hold for L&D Professionals

womens-march

On January 21, 2017, the day after the U.S. Presidential Inauguration, about a gazillion women, men and children took to the streets in cities across the United States and around the world, in order to make sure that their voices, although not represented by the incoming administration, could nonetheless be heard.

When the marching began, I was sitting in an airport in Nairobi, Kenya, traveling from one training program to another. I watched the images roll in on CNN and I listened to several people from Kenya, standing behind me, exclaim: “HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS of people are marching?! Wow.” It struck me that there were some very real lessons that learning and development professionals could take away Continue reading

A few L&D lessons inspired by a heroic grandfather

admiral-patrick

A young woman named Charlotte clutched her infant daughter (also named Charlotte) as her boat began it’s journey from Hawaii to the mainland.

There was nothing normal about this particular crossing. It was December 7, 1941 and Charlotte could see bombs dropping on the other side of the island. She knew her husband, a young naval officer, was somewhere in that mess, but she didn’t know anything else about his whereabouts or his safety.   Continue reading

When you present, your audience wants to feel something. So give them what they want!

In his book Brain Rules, John Medina writes, “Emotionally arousing events tend to be better remembered than neutral events.” A key goal, then, is to tap into the audience’s emotion and try to stir up feelings that will make their learning experience memorable.

What happens if you don’t feel like you’re able to tap into your audience’s emotions? How then can you help them to feel something?

Chris Ernst from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation recently offered a solution to this quandary.

keynote-cards

Continue reading

Sometimes you just have to be silly

silly

I looked on in horror as the facilitator arched her back, lifted her shoulders, raised her arms as if she had claws, opened her mouth and let out something resembling a screech.

I was at the LINGOs Global Learning Forum, attending Kristin Hibler‘s session on “L&D Applications of Improv”, and one at a time we were all supposed to copy what the facilitator had just done.

Nope. Uh-uh. Continue reading