Have you ever tried Pecha Kucha? I just did, and this is what I learned…

I’ve written about Pecha Kucha-style presentations before (here and here), but I’d never actually put one together until last week.

For those unfamiliar with Pecha Kucha-style presentations, they are tightly structured presentations that require you to present on your topic using exactly 20 slides, each slide lasting only 20 seconds. The slides are generally set to auto-advance. The entire presentation is six minutes and forty seconds.

I had an opportunity to serve as the emcee at this year’s ATD Puget Sound Chapter annual workplace learning conference. One of the breakout presentations was on the topic of Pecha Kucha-style presentations and, in the spirit of showing participants one potential way to apply what was learned during the day, I thought it would be fun to issue a closing call-to-action using the Pecha Kucha format.

Here is a video of my presentation, and a few lessons Continue reading

Crowdsourcing Training Trivia

Crowd Sourcing

This coming Thursday I’ll be serving as the emcee for the Association of Talent Development Puget Sound (ATDps) chapter’s annual conference. As I was talking over this opportunity with a colleague, she asked what I’d be doing to engage the audience from the beginning.

One idea that came to me is that we could get the audience engaged before the session even begins. This is where, dear reader, I need some help from you today.   Continue reading

Trainer’s Fishbowl: An Inside Look at a Pilot Program that Didn’t Hit the Mark

Fishbowl

This week we had an opportunity to pilot a training program that we’ve been working on for the past two months. We were excited to unveil it before a pilot audience, especially because we had an opportunity to incorporate a board game into the module.

At the end of the pilot session, we realized that we didn’t quite hit the mark in our first draft. Yesterday, the Endurance Learning leadership team came together via Slack to debrief the experience.

Today’s post is a sort of “fish bowl”, an opportunity to take a look into the conversation that took place as we de-briefed this session.   Continue reading

Want to be better in your L&D craft? Get involved outside of your organization.

I have a lot of coffee – both in-person and virtual – with L&D professionals and there’s one question that always comes up: how did you get to where you are?

I can safely say that I wouldn’t be where I am today without getting involved in self-initiated professional development on projects and activities outside of my own organization. I can also say that too few other L&D professionals look beyond their own organizations to get involved, and therefore hone their craft.

Here are five ways I’ve gotten involved, and how I’ve benefited from these activities Continue reading

L&D Spotlight On… JD Dillon

“Building connections between people, not content.”

In February I asked a number of my colleagues in the learning and development field to sum up their careers using exactly six words. JD Dillon was the first to respond with the six words at the beginning of this post.

I’ve been wanting to take a step back from training tips and tricks for a while, writing a post on bigger picture L&D strategy. As I began to gather my thoughts and skim through my Twitter feed for inspiration, I realized that there are already some very good, very smart posts on the topic. Many of those articles have been written by JD.

Instead of saying similar things, just with different words, I’d like to use today’s post to spotlight three of his most recent posts on learning and development strategy.   Continue reading

On diversity training, the Google Bro and just being a good person at the office.

Diversity Day

If you don’t want a more equitable and inclusive work environment, you’re not a good person. Period. Full stop.

Can we train our way out of a labor system that has a history of putting certain groups ahead of others, a history that spans from the very beginning of this country with slavery until present day when women make 82 cents for every dollar that a man makes and when combined, African Americans and Hispanics make up only 9% of the workforce in the top 75 tech companies in Silicon Valley (though they make up 31% of the overall US population)?   Continue reading